The Medea Complex by Rachel Florence Roberts

the medea complex

Blurb from goodreads.com, please scroll down for my review

****BASED ON A TRUE STORY***

1885. Anne Stanbury – Committed to a lunatic asylum, having been deemed insane and therefore unfit to stand trial for the crime of which she is indicted. But is all as it seems?

Edgar Stanbury – the grieving husband and father who is torn between helping his confined wife recover her sanity, and seeking revenge on the woman who ruined his life.

Dr George Savage – the well respected psychiatrist, and chief medical officer of Bethlem Royal Hospital. Ultimately, he holds Anne’s future wholly in his hands.

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The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

the kitchen houseBlurb from goodreads.com, please scroll down for my review.

When a white servant girl violates the order of plantation society, she unleashes a tragedy that exposes the worst and best in the people she has come to call her family. Orphaned while onboard ship from Ireland, seven-year-old Lavinia arrives on the steps of a tobacco plantation where she is to live and work with the slaves of the kitchen house. Under the care of Belle, the master’s illegitimate daughter, Lavinia becomes deeply bonded to her adopted family, though she is set apart from them by her white skin.

Eventually, Lavinia is accepted into the world of the big house, where the master is absent and the mistress battles opium addiction. Continue reading

Special Review – The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

the book thiefI have gone for a slightly different review on this one, Tried twice to read this but on both occasions just couldn´t get into it, and when my online book club choose this for the August monthly book, I decided to add a whole lot of reviews and comments from various members. I found it great to read all the different opinions. I hope you enjoy them too.

Blurb from goodreads.com, please scroll down the comments.
It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still.

Liesel Meminger is a foster girl living outside of Munich, who scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can’t resist–books. With the help of her accordion-playing foster-father, she learns to read and shares her stolen books with her neighbors during bombing raids as well as with the Jewish man hidden in her basement.

In superbly crafted writing that burns with intensity, award-winning author Markus Zusak, author of I Am the Messenger, has given us one of the most enduring stories of our time.

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Yellow Crocus by Laila Ibrahim

yellow crocusblurb from goodreads.com please scroll down for my review.

Mattie was never truly mine. That knowledge must have filled me as quickly and surely as the milk from her breasts. Although my family ‘owned’ her, although she occupied the center of my universe, her deepest affections lay elsewhere. So along with the comfort of her came the fear that I would lose her some day. This is our story…

So begins Lisbeth Wainwright’s compelling tale of coming-of-age in antebellum Virginia. Born to white plantation owners but raised by her enslaved black wet-nurse, Mattie, Lisbeth’s childhood unfolds on the line between two very different worlds. Continue reading

The Devils Fire by Matt Tomerlin

the devils fireBlurb from goodreads.com, please scroll down for my review.

The waters of the Caribbean run red in this brutal tale of revenge set during the Golden Age of Piracy! Katherine Lindsay, the pampered young wife of a wealthy ship captain, has left her leisurely life in London to accompany her husband to America. So far, their journey has been uneventful, even boring. But when ruthless pirates suddenly storm on board to plunder her husband’s riches, Katherine is one of the treasures they steal, sparking a bloody chain of events that will change the Caribbean forever. Pirate lovers will find no shortage of treachery, cutlass duels, ship-to-ship battles, buried treasure and much, much more.

4 out of 5 stars.

It certainly starts well, setting the scene wonderfully in the year 1717 on board a ship travelling from London to America and it gripped me immediately. I could feel the scene and even smell it. Written well, in the third person and with each chapter corresponding to a character in the book, with stunning descriptions which make you feel you are there with the pirates on the ship and at the locations they visit. There is no jumping about which can drive me to leave a book midway, so this is just great. The book has the right amount of dialogue, description and action for me. There are some good pirates and some dark pirates making you warm to either one or the other.

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Review – Pyotr Ilyich by Adin Dalton

pyotr ilyichBlurb from Goodreads.com, please scroll down for my review.
Saint Petersburg, 1893.
In the dimly lit salon of a private house, the composer Tchaikovsky watches as an illegal jury considers his alleged crimes of licentious behavior. He hastily agrees to abide by their orders to swallow poison rather than face allegations in the official courts, but is terrified by the reality of the situation. As he considers how his life has led him to this point, a dark tale emerges.
Tchaikovsky’s immense fame, unlawful sexuality, mysterious death, and the splendid music which surrounds it all paint a unique and intriguing portrait of one of the most beloved composers of all time. Can he find a way out of the web of revenge and deceit? Or will Fate have the last word?

Historical Fiction. 4 stars out of 5.

I am not sure my review could do the book justice, but I will give it a go:
Tchaikovsky. Ever heard the name before? I am sure you have, and if you haven´t, well you probably should have, but, did you know his first names? Maybe not. Pyotr Ilyich Tchailovsky is his full name. But how much do you actually know about the composer? not much I can imagine, and neither did I until I read this novel. Give it a go and you will learn about his life and loves and death. This novel is the story of Tchaikovsky.

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Best Kept Secret – Jeffrey Archer

Best Kept SecretInfo from Gooreads.com, please scroll down for my review, beware, may contain spoilers.

New York Times bestseller Jeffrey Archer continues his beloved Clifton Chronicle series as Harry and Emma finally begin building a happy life—but a dangerous family enemy is about to resurface.

Best Kept Secret opens a moment after the end of The Sins of the Father, with the resolution of the trial and the triumphant marriage of Harry Clifton and Elizabeth Barrington, finally uniting their family. Harry, now a bestselling novelist, Emma, their son Sebastian, and orphaned Jessica make a new life for themselves, but all is not as happy and secure as it could be. Emma’s brother, Giles, is engaged to a woman who may be more interested in Barrington’s fortune and title than in a long and happy marriage. And Sebastian, though he is bright, isn’t quite the hard worker that his father was at school, and finds a hard time resisting the temptations that his somewhat unsavory friends provide.

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The Genesis Secret – Tom Knox

The Genesis SecretFirst off, some information from Goodreads website on the book. Scroll down for my thoughts. Beware: my review  may contain spoilers.

A gripping high-concept thriller for fans of Dan Brown and Sam Bourne.

In the sunburnt deserts of eastern Turkey, archaeologists are unearthing a stone temple, the world’s most ancient building. When Journalist Rob Luttrell is sent to report on the dig, he is intrigued to learn that someone deliberately buried the site 10,000 years ago. Why?

Meanwhile, in London, a bizarre attack is baffling the police. When a weird killing takes place on the Isle of Man, followed by another in rural Dorset, DC Mark Forrester begins to discern a curious pattern in these apparently random murders.

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The Cave – Kate Mosse

The CaveFirst off, some information from Goodreads website on the book. Scroll down for my thoughts. Beware: my review  may contain spoilers.

It is March 1928. The Great War has been over for ten years, but Freddie still hasn’t recovered from the loss of his brother. Even now, on holiday in south-west France, he cannot escape his grief. When his car crashes, Freddie stumbles down the hills to a village nearby. There he meets Marie, a beautiful young woman, who is also mourning a lost generation. Her story of the fate of her family moves him deeply. But it will also lead him to the caves above the village – and to the heart of a shocking secret.

A very nice short novel (at around 100 pages) easy to read when you can catch a spare moment. I enjoyed the book, a simple ghost story, a bit predictable. Freddie the main character has a car accident while on route to visit his friends and then the rest of the story is all in his imagination (except the reader doesn´t know that yet).

i enjoy it, it filled an hour of my time, even though I am not a fan of ghost stories. Ask yourself if you have a bit of time (an hour ish) enjoy ghost stories beofre reading this though.